FOR MOST UPDATED CITY ORDINANCES : CITY OF SHERIDAN

 

6-23 Vaccination against rabies—Prerequisite to issuance of license.

 Every person owning a dog within the city, before obtaining a license for such dog, shall present satisfactory evidence that the dog for which such license is bought has been vaccinated against rabies as required in this section at the time application is made for such license. All dogs and cats shall be vaccinated against rabies annually if a one-year vaccine is being used, and every three years if a three-year vaccine is used. All vaccinations shall be considered valid only if administered by a licensed doctor of veterinary medicine. (Ord. No. 938, § 2, 3-28-55: Ord. No. 1951, § 1, 6-07-04.)

6-38 Release of impounded dogs and cats; fees.

    Before any impounded dog or cat is released, there shall be paid to the dog and cat shelter, a boarding fee for each day or fraction thereof that the dog or cat is impounded, the amount to be determined by the shelter manager with direction from the shelter board, the amount to be reasonable and customary for such fees in the region. The shelter manager may waive impound fee’s when the fees would, due to financial difficulty, prevent the pet from being returned to its proper owner. In addition, a pound master’s fee of ten dollars for each neutered male or spayed female; provided that proof of such neuter or spay is furnished to a representative of the dog and cat shelter, or a fee of twenty-five dollars for each un-neutered male or unspayed female over the age of six months, plus the license fee for any unlicensed dog. The certification for inoculation of rabies from a veterinarian must also be exhibited before any dog may be released. (Ord. No. 938, § 10, 3-28-55; Ord. No. 1131, § 2, 6-10-68; Ord. No. 1181, § 1, 5-10-71; Ord. No. 1357, § 4; 5-2-77: Ord. No. 1951, § 2, 6-07-04.)

Vaccinations for Cats

  • Vaccines protect animals and people from specific viral and bacterial infections. They are not a treatment. If your companion cat gets sick because he is not properly vaccinated, the vaccinations should be given after your pet recovers.
  • Kittens should be vaccinated with a combination vaccine (called a 3 in 1) at 2, 3 and 4 months of age and then annually. This vaccine protects cats from panleukopenia (also called feline distemper), calicivirus and rhinotracheitis (flu-like viruses). If you have an unvaccinated cat older than 4 months of age, he needs a series of two vaccinations given 2 to 3 weeks apart, followed by a yearly vaccination.
  • There is a vaccine available for feline leukemia virus (FeLV). This is one of the two immune system viruses (retroviruses) that infect cats. The other is feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). There is no vaccine available for FIV. Cats can be infected with either virus for months to years without any indication that they are carrying a fatal virus. You cannot look at cats or kittens and know if they are infected—a blood test is necessary. All cats should be tested for these viruses. Infections can be transmitted at birth from the mother or by being bitten by an infected cat. Neither virus can infect humans. Many outdoor and stray cats and kittens carry this infection. Because of the fatal nature of these diseases, you should not expose the cats already living in your home by taking in untested cats or kittens. To be safe, keep your cat indoors, but if your cat does go outside, he should be vaccinated against feline leukemia virus. No vaccine is 100 percent effective.

Vaccinations for Dogs

  • Vaccines protect animals and people from specific viral and bacterial infections. They are not a treatment. If your pet gets sick because he is not properly vaccinated, the vaccination should be given after your companion animal recovers.
  • Puppies should be vaccinated with a combination vaccine (called a 5 in 1) at 2, 3 and 4 months of age and then once annually. This vaccine protects the puppy from distemper, hepatitis, leptospirosis, parvovirus, and parainfluenza. A puppy’s vaccination program cannot be finished before four months of age. Rottweilers, Doberman pinschers and American Staffordshire terriers/pit bulls should be vaccinated until five months of age. If you have an unvaccinated dog older than four or five months, the dog needs a series of two vaccinations given two to three weeks apart, followed by a yearly vaccination. Do not walk your puppy or your unvaccinated dog outside or put her on the floor of an animal hospital until several days after her final vaccination.
  • Since laws vary around the country, contact a local veterinarian for information on rabies vaccination. In New York City, for example, the law requires all pets older than three months of age to be vaccinated for rabies. The first rabies vaccine must be followed by a vaccination a year later and then every three years.
  • Other vaccines for dogs are appropriate in certain situations. Your dog’s veterinarian can tell you about these vaccines.